Enigma

I was fortunate to live in a beautiful environment when I was living with my parents.  Our house was backed up against a nature preserve in Northern California where coyotes, bobcat, deer, and rattle snakes roamed.  The nature preserve consisted of rolling foothills covered with long silver grass and oak trees.  Beyond the preserve was the densely forested Santa Cruz mountain range and beyond that lay the mighty Pacific.

I spent much time wandering in that preserve during the day and the night.  It was  a magical place.  On one side was unspoiled nature, on the other side one could view the entire bay area from San Jose all the way to San Francisco.  The contrast was even more remarkable on a moonlit night.  On one side was the silver fog rolling over the Santa Cruz mountains like a giant Pacific wave, on the other side one could see the city of lights and the thousands of cars constantly meandering like a snake along the 280 freeway.  You could hear the slight but constant hum of the cars in motion.

It was here that I felt most at home especially at sunset or at night when the wind blew.  It was here that I took my first true love.  It was here that I would go before a big high school baseball or football game to calm my nerves and gain perspective.  It was here I went with my beloved brother to contemplate our existence.  And it was here that I realized mankind has yet to figure out the Enigma.

Advertisements

17 thoughts on “Enigma

  1. From my “top secret” version of Aurelius’ “Meditations”–but your post here is so moving I felt compelled to remove the veil of secrecy: “Never able, no matter how hard and against your will you tried, to reconcile wandering like an untamed young horse in the wild-grassed Californian hills, the white fog rolling and swirling over the distant Santa Cruz Mountains; and the world–and every unclean, broken thing that is of it–below.”

  2. I guess some of the “enigma” is the variance between your private experience of nature,the “revelations” nature provided for you, and what the human race has done with nature. James Norman Hall (co-wrote Mutiny on the Bounty) came back to his beloved Iowa after serving in WW1, to find paved roads and loud cars meandering through his farmland and fields…….he found himself disillusioned with what he saw as America taking the wrong path to the future- land speculation etc…………simply moved to Tahiti and spent his life there. Not sure how this relates to your experience, but just because humans choose a course does not mean it is the “best” way to go, and the individual in nature has a chance to sense a better way, a better world, and is left with what to do about that…………….

  3. Idyllic place to begin life’s adventures – you are lucky to have this foundation. I grew up in a post WW2 Britain where your wilderness was a dream – yet we found fields of hay and questing behind our row houses and acted out our fantasies amongst the skeletons of bombed buildings. The young are eternally indomitable and discover their lives despite ruin and despair – this gives us wings…

    • The foundation was good and bad. Often I wish my youth was spent in more challenging and difficult circumstances. You seemed to have forged your way to beauty through the rough road.

      • Some rough, some smooth like all of us. I’ve been incredibly lucky in so many aspects of my life. My childhood was a struggle for my parents but they gave me a loving and secure foundation and I would wish this for all children. What I lacked in material things I made up for with good friends and the world of the imagination…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s